Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from March, 2014

The Follower of Dreams

©S. M. Gallagher 2016

Shall I start by saying that I have always been a follower of dreams, my pilgrimage beginning by a rainy day window? We long for what we don’t have; and, for me in my eleventh year on this planet earth, it was always a yearning for adventure that beckoned, alluring and unreachable. It was, alas, for a different age than my minor years. But I oh so wanted to board Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki and sail with him and his crew in their ‘Ra’ expedition to Easter Island. I knew all about it, of course, having just read the wondrous tale in my mother’s condensed version of the Reader’s Digest. Only years later would I be able to actualize this dream – somewhat – as in 2010 I visited the Norwegian museum where all the Heyerdahl boats, rafts and sundries are stored, well-preserved and treasured by a culture that venerates its explorers. 

Growing up, I quenched my thirst for adventure in stories written by my own hand and books printed by others. I suppose it’s the former, and m…

Raised by a Fly-boy Father...who could not sit still

©Shers Gallagher 2016
Over miles with himwe 'rode or bust'to this and that highwayand some other bywaythat stretched acrossthe Great Divide. He settled in the end,back to where he started.And I, like him,having been raised in motion,could not sit still.Over miles aloneI trekkedacross lava rock that glistenedlike jagged points of deathand Steppes that went nowhereuntil they sank into the sun.Only then,like my father,did I arrive with a yearning to come back home.
Aisling Books

Tír na nÓg...a tale of the Irish spirit linked to mythology

- retold by storyteller: Shers Gallagher ©2016 Fadó…..Long, long ago, in a time you could barely even think of, as it existed beyond the stars, was a land that those of Irish ancestry call Tír na nÓg – or Land of Eternal Youth. Like the Avalon of the English, it was a place beyond the edges of the map in the northwest sound. Yet, not even the hardiest of seafarers could reach it unless they were willing to gamble an arduous voyage; or, better yet, be given safe passage by one of its elven folk. But that never happened…unless you happened to be lucky like Oisín, the handsome son of Finn McCool and his deer goddess wife. In fact, the name Oisín means ‘little deer’. And the young son of this legendary hero and goddess wife grew up to be extremely handsome. Tír na nÓg is a place of eternal youth and beauty where sickness and death do not exist. Only music, strength, life and all pleasurable pursuits come together here. Happiness lasts forever, and no one ever goes hungry or thirsty. It is…