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Charing Cross Road 1937: a moment's reflection


©Shers Gallagher 2016
A little less than 80 years ago….
Time was fraught with global uncertainty and utter anxiety.
But it was a near century of hope, shining strong and virtuous.
Juxtapose this against today's toxicity that doubts too many beginnings
before they are allowed their time to germinate and hatch. 
Thus, modern cynicism can easily squelch the good of living life,
calling it 'bad' in turn and time. 
And the 'good' of these days can be overlooked and branded 'boring'.
Still….
Our parents' THEN versus your and my NOW I would not want to live in,
not for all the advancements made in our millennial world, 
incredible as they all are.
Shouldn't we then teach ourselves not to lose the simple loveliness in just being?
Shouldn't we learn again to dance and sing, and to set aside time to splash in all the ‘puddle wonderfuls’ 
that we can grasp,
just as in the days of ‘84 Charing Cross Road’?
I don't know about you, 
but I would much prefer this than to remain in the lonely ME world of Selfie hedonism.

Aisling Books 

Comments

  1. Brilliant ~ at the age of 74 I totally agree. Happy New Year.

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  2. But in 1937 it was only 2 years until we almost destroyed the world... maybe it's the same now, but we don't really know... hmm selfies back then was for artists only.

    ReplyDelete
  3. this is breath-taking!

    "Shouldn't we then teach ourselves not to lose the simple loveliness in just being?"

    Yes! I so miss the simplicity of older times. I am 33 and even my own childhood is vastly different than my daughters. Screens and devices have taken the place of people and interaction. It's sad.

    stacy
    http://warningthestars.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good message in a distracted, harried, narcissistic world. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm with you. Perhaps we can create something new and different! Well said!

    ReplyDelete

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